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  • Lose Weight or Build Muscle

    1. Your Stats

    feet inches
    lbs
    cm
    kg
    Eat
    calories/day

    Note
    Before starting anything here, you have read and understood the disclaimer.

    2. Your Diet Plan

    2a. Buy food from the Simple Grocery List:

    • Simple Grocery List
      • Low calories   Weight gainer  $ Low budget
      • Bases (Pick 5–6)
      • Onion $
      • Carrot $
      • Celery
      • Garlic $
      • Ginger $
      • Bell Pepper
      • Tomato
      • Mushroom
      • Leek
      • Lemongrass
      • Vegetables (Pick 3–5)
      • Kale
      • Collard Greens
      • Bok Choy
      • Arugula
      • Spinach
      • Chard
      • Broccoli
      • Brussels Sprout
      • Asparagus
      • Squash
      • Cabbage
      • Lettuce
      • Cauliflower
      • Radish
      • Cucumber
      • Beet
      • Proteins (Pick 3–4)
      • Whey Protein $
      • Eggs $
      • Beef
      • Chicken
      • Lamb
      • Fish
      • Pork
      • Shellfish
      • Venison
      • Fruits (Pick 2)
      • Avocado
      • Berries
      • Coconut
      • Cherry
      • Apple
      • Banana
      • Orange
      • Pomegranate
      • Lemon/Lime
      • Guava
      • Kiwi
      • Pear
      • Mango
      • Starches (Pick 2)
      • Potatoes/Yams $
      • Oats $
      • Quinoa
      • Chickpeas
      • Kidney Beans
      • Barley
      • Rye Bread
      • Rice (Long-Grain) $
      • Whole Wheat Bread
      • Corn on the Cob
      • Supplementary (Pick 2–3)
      • Greek Yogurt
      • Cheese
      • Whole Milk
      • Cream Cheese
      • Cream
      • Almonds
      • Walnuts
      • Unsalted Seeds
      • Oils (Pick 2)
      • Virgin Coconut Oil
      • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
      • Avocado Oil
      • Tallow
      • Ghee
      • Butter

    This grocery list is based on the SSF Food Pyramid. For a complete list of ingredients including herbs and spices, check out Essential Foods.

    2b. Track your calories and macronutrients:

    Use an application such as MyFitnessPal or swole.me to input your grocery list based on your calories to this macronutrient ratio:

    Macronutrient ↓ Weight Loss ↑ Build Muscle
    Carbohydrates 20% 25%
    Protein 35% 30%
    Fat 45% 45%

    For a more comprehensive & optimized macronutrient plan, try our Macronutrient Calculator and Macronutrient Suggestions.

    2c. With your groceries, make your meals:

    You may benefit from using the Meal Planning section which includes the SSF Make-a-Meal method and Recipes.

    A Personal Approach
    If you require a nutrition analysis, please contact Simple Science Fitness.

    3. Your Exercise Program

    Suggested Program(s)
    • SSF 3x
      Day Exercise Sets Reps Rest
      A Squat 3 5–8 3'
      Bench Press 3 5–8 3'
      Chin-Up 3 1–15 2'
      B Deadlift 1 5 3'
      Overhead Press 3 5–8 3'
      Barbell Row 3 5–8 2'
      Note: The ' marker denotes time in minutes.

      Frequency

      Perform a workout day (A or B) three times a week on nonconsecutive days. For example, every Monday, Wednesday, and Fridays. Each week will alternate as workouts ABA and BAB.

      Duration

      Each workout is approximately 30–40 minutes long.

      Cycle

      Apply progressive overload for 6–8 weeks, then take one week off to allow the body and central nervous system to recover.

      Accessory Exercises

      You may add accessory exercises such as the stiff-legged deadlift, barbell curl, and calf raise.

      Expectations

      Following proper diet, rest, and sleep, while applying progressive overload, you will expect to see strength and muscle increases on a bulk, or preservation of muscle mass while shedding fat on a cut.

    • SSF 4x
      Day Exercise Sets Reps Rest
      Mon Front Squat 3–4 5 3'
      Stiff-Legged Deadlift 3–4 6–8 3'
      Barbell Squat 2–3 10–12 3'
      Calf Raise 3–4 6–8 3'
      Tues Bench Press 3–4 6–8 3'
      Barbell Row 3–4 6–8 3'
      Lateral Raise 2–3 10–12 2'
      Chin-Up 2–3 10–12 2'
      Dip 1–2 12–15 2'
      Barbell Curl 1–2 12–15 1.5'
      Thurs Deadlift 1–2 5 3'
      Leg Press 3–4 6–8 3'
      Calf Raise 3–4 10–12 2'
      Hack Squat 2–3 10–12 2'
      Fri Overhead Press 3–4 6–8 3'
      Pull-Up 3–4 6–8 3'
      Dumbbell Fly 3–4 10–12 2'
      Barbell Row 3–4 10–12 2'
      Close-Grip Bench Press 1–2 12–15 1.5'
      Hammer Curl 1–2 12–15 1.5'
      Note: The ' marker denotes time in minutes.
      Frequency

      Days focusing on only the upper or lower body are grouped together on consecutive days and there are four workouts per week. This routine is set to have Wednesdays and weekends off, however you can change to a Sunday/Monday/Wednesday/Thursday or Tuesday/Wednesday/Friday/Saturday format.

      Duration

      Each workout is approximately 60 minutes long.

      Cycle

      Apply progressive overload for 6–8 weeks, then deload for 2 weeks at 80% and 90% of your heaviest weights. There are no rest weeks, unless needed.

    • SSF 5x
      Day Exercise Sets Reps Rest
      Mon Front Squat 3 6 3'
      Lunge 3 8–12 3'
      Barbell Squat 2–3 10–12 3'
      Stiff-Legged Deadlift 3 6–8 3'
      Calf Raise 3 10–12 1'
      Wheel Rollout 3 Max 1'
      Tues Bench Press (Heavy) 3 6–8 3'
      Bench Press (Light) 3 10–12 2'
      Weighed Push-Up 3 8–12 2'
      Dumbbell Fly 3 10–12 2'
      Dumbbell Bench Press 3 10–12 2'
      Wed Deadlift 2 5 3'
      Weighed Pull-Up 3 6–12 2'
      Barbell Row 3 10–12 2'
      Cable Seated Row 3 6–8 2'
      Dumbbell Row 3 10–12 2'
      Fri Overhead Press 5 8–12 3'
      Face Pull 3 10–12 2'
      Dumbbell Shoulder Press 3 10–12 2'
      Dumbbell Lateral Raise 3 10–12 2'
      Dumbbell Front Raise 3 10–12 2'
      Dumbbell Shrugs 3 10–12 1'
      Sat Bodyweight/Weighed Chin-Up 3 6–12 1'
      Bodyweight/Weighed Dip 3 6–8 1'
      Barbell Bicep Curl 4 6–8 1'
      Barbell Tricep Extension 4 8–12 1'
      Hammer Curl 3 8–12 1'
      Close-Grip Bench Press 3 10–12 1'
      Dumbbell Bicep Curl 3 8–12 1'
      Tricep Pulldown 3 8–12 1'
      Note: The ' marker denotes time in minutes.
      Frequency

      Five workout days per week, with Thursdays and Sundays off. You could shift the days over to have Monday and Friday off, or Tuesday and Saturday off.

      Duration

      Each workout is approximately 50 minutes long.

      Cycle

      Apply progressive overload for 8–12 weeks, then take one week off.

    If you are unfamiliar with the above exercises, please read the Exercise section. The e-book has bodyweight versions.

    • Individual
      • Dancing
      • Elliptical
      • Jump Rope
      • Running
      • Sprints
      • Steps
      • Stationary Bike
      • Treadmill
      • Walking
      • Wall Climbing
    • Group
      • Boot Camp
      • Dance
      • Martial Arts
      • Pilates
      • Tai Chi
      • Spinning
      • Yoga
      • Zumba
    • Sports
      • Badminton
      • Basketball
      • Baseball
      • Boxing
      • Cricket
      • Cycling
      • Football
      • Hockey
      • Rugby
      • Soccer
      • Swimming
      • Skateboarding
      • Skiing/Snowboarding
      • Surfing
      • Tennis
      • Ultimate Frisbee
      • Volleyball
      • Wrestling

Is This Your Typical Lifestyle?

Typical Breakfast
Typical Lunch
Typical Dinner
Unhealthy Meal Totals
Unhealthy Activity
Unhealthy Result

This is a Healthier Lifestyle

Healthy Breakfast
Healthy Lunch
Healthy Dinner
Healthy Meal Totals
Healthy Activity
Healthy Result

Why?

At a quick glance, the big differences are:

  • 4280 calories vs. 2172 calories.
  • 192 g sugar vs. 31 g sugar.
  • 0 calories burned vs. 250 calories burned.
  • Hungry and thirsty vs. satiated and hydrated.

How does this work?

The Reality

People are getting sicker and fatter, and to many, it's a mystery. However, if you look a little closer, understand a little more, and accept certain realities, the solutions are simple.

Taking that next step can be a challenge.

Invest in Your Health

We have only one life to live. A healthier life is a better life. A happier, confident, and rewarding one for your mind, body, and soul. But it takes a lifestyle change.

Let's learn how.

Glossary

Anaerobic and Aerobic: Anaerobic respiration means the "absence of oxygen" and aerobic respiration means "with oxygen." Anaerobic exercises require short bursts of energy while aerobic exercises can be performed over long periods of time.

Bulking: Bulking is increasing body weight with an emphasis on building muscle.

Cutting: Cutting is decreasing body fat and weight while preserving muscle mass.

Diet: Food and drink that a person consistently consumes.

Empty Calories: Calories that contain little to no nutrients. Sugar is a source of empty calories.

Fitness: A state of being with strength, mobility, and endurance, while being free of chronic disease.

Hyperpalatable: Food products that are engineered by food scientists to create insatiable overconsumption are considered hyperpalatable. Salt, sugar, fat, and wheat flour are combined to maximize pleasure in the brain's reward system, simulating the effects of addictive substances.

IIFYM (If It Fits Your Macros): A rule of thumb to eat anything as long as it fits within your macronutrient ratio and calorie range. It works, although it does not necessarily reflect good health if the food sources are of low quality.

Inflammation: Where part of the body becomes reddened, swollen, hot, or painful in response to an infection. Food-related inflammation is linked to modern diseases.

Macronutrients: Fat, carbohydrate, and protein are macronutrients. They are required by the body in large amounts to sustain life. Alcohol is also considered a macronutrient.

Metabolic Syndrome: A cluster of medical conditions, or modern diseases, including obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, raised triglycerides, and low HDL cholesterol.

Metabolism: The chemical processes by which cells produce the substances and energy needed to sustain life.

Micronutrients: Vitamins, minerals, or acids required by the body in small amounts for healthy growth and development.

Moderation: Avoidance of extremes or excesses.

Nutrients: Substances essential for growth and the maintenance of life.

Palatable: Pleasant to taste.

Processed Food (or "convenience foods"): Food commercially prepared for ease of consumption. Examples are ramen noodles, deli meat, cereals, potato chips, TV dinners, and fast food meals.

Satiety: The feeling of fullness, or satisfaction of an appetite.

Sedentary: A person who spends most of their time sitting instead of being active. A sedentary lifestyle is associated with early death.

Thermogenesis: The mechanism where the body uses energy as heat, instead of storing it as fat.

  Let's get started

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Copyright © 2017 Simple Science Fitness/Joachim Lapiak.